Assessor Property Record Search Outage

Assessor's property record search will be down 5 p.m. Oct. 20 until 8 a.m. Oct. 23.

The Assessor's Office property record search application will be unavailable from 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 20 until approximately 8 a.m. on Monday, Oct. 23. This outage is to allow for system maintenance.

We apologize for any inconvenience the outage may cause.  

Environmental Health

Contact Us

  • Phone: 970-328-8755
    Fax: 970-328-8788

    Environmental Health
    P.O. Box 179
    500 Broadway
    Eagle, CO 81631-0179 

    environment@eaglecounty.us


Indoor Air

Sources of Indoor Air Pollution
Asbestos
Carbon Monoxide
Lead
Mold
Radon
Tobacco Smoke/Secondhand Smoke
Fireplaces, Furnaces, Stoves

Asbestos

Asbestos is commonly used as an acoustic insulator, in thermal insulation, fire proofing and other building materials. Asbestos is made up of microscopic bundles of fibers that may become airborne when distributed. These fibers get into the air and may become inhaled into the lungs, where they may cause significant health problems. Researchers still have not determined a safe level of exposure but we know the greater and longer the exposure, the greater the risk of contracting an asbestos related disease.

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Carbon Monoxide

Carbon Monoxide (CO) is produced whenever any fuel such as gas, oil, kerosene, wood or charcoal is burned. If appliances that burn fuel are maintained and used properly, exposure to CO can be avoided. However, if appliances are not working properly or are used incorrectly, exposure to dangerous levels of CO can result.  Improperly vented furnaces, boilers and water heaters are a common source of indoor carbon monoxide problems. Carbon monoxide detectors are beneficial, and can be purchased at your local hardware store.  The proper use and maintenance of your fuel-burning appliances will lower your risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.

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Lead

Old lead-based paint is the most significant source of lead exposure in the U.S. today. The dust and chips from lead-based paint are dangerous when swallowed or inhaled; children and pregnant women are especially at risk. Harmful exposures to lead can occur when lead-based paint is improperly removed from surfaces by dry scraping, sanding, open-flame burning, or by demolition. A home built before 1978 is likely to have surfaces painted with lead-based paint.

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Mold

Molds produce tiny spores to reproduce. Mold spores waft through the indoor and outdoor air continually. When mold spores land on a damp spot indoors, they may begin growing and digesting whatever they are growing on in order to survive. There are molds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet, and foods. When excessive moisture or water accumulates indoors, mold growth will often occur, particularly if the moisture problem remains undiscovered or is not addressed. There is no practical way to eliminate all mold and mold spores in the indoor environment; the way to control indoor mold growth is to control moisture.

Environmental Health does not perform inspections on private residences or commercial buildings for mold or air quality.

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Radon

Radon is a colorless and odorless gas that naturally occurs in our environment and originates from certain geologies that contain shale and similar ores. Radon is heavier than air and can migrate into your home through cracks or other small openings in the foundation or crawlspace. It can even be present in ground water and enter your home when water from your well is exposed to the indoor environment as it pours from fixtures and settles to the floor.

Eagle County recommends that everyone be aware of their risk from exposure to radon gas by simply obtaining an inexpensive test kit available from your local hardware store or by calling 1-800-767-RADON. This test will only provide short-term information about a gas that can cause cancer after long-term exposure. Still, it is the most appropriate and inexpensive way to initiate your research.

Radon gas is one of the easiest environmental hazards to overcome by understanding the risk of exposure and what simple actions can be taken to prevent the entry of radon into your home. 

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Tobacco Smoke/Secondhand Smoke

In 2006 Eagle County Government took measures to curb pollution from tobacco smoke with a smoking ordinance. 

Fireplaces, Furnaces, Stoves

In addition to tobacco smoke, other sources of combustion products are unvented kerosene and gas space heaters, woodstoves, fireplaces, and gas stoves. The major pollutants released are carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and particles.

Tips for reducing exposure to combustion products in homes are as followed:

  • Take special precautions when operating fuel-burning unvented space heaters.
  • Install and use exhaust fans over gas cooking stoves and ranges and keep the burners properly adjusted.
  • Have central air handling systems, including furnaces, flues, and chimneys, inspected annually and properly repair cracks or damaged parts.
Keep woodstove emissions to a minimum. Choose properly-sized new stoves that are certified as meeting EPA emission standards.

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